Picture
In our house carrots are always the go to side dish.  Once again the table is ruled by my son's limited taste buds (not really).  Carrots are just easy to make or just serve raw at any meal.  I really can't think of a meat they do not go easily with.  More often than not we serve them raw though.  I however, especially during the winter like to cook them.  Finding new and interesting ways to cook them is also easy.  You can microwave them, boil them or bake them with oils, honey, garlic, brown sugar, any syrup and bam! You have a side dish. This is a recipe I can remember from when I was a child.  I'm not sure if it was one of my grandmothers who made it or just on the table at family get togethers.  I know it was there though.  Simple quick and delicious.
Picture
Print Friendly and PDF
Serves 4


Recipe:


  • 2 Cups  (320 g) Baby Carrots
  • 1 TBSP Butter
  • 2 TBSP Brown Sugar (packed)
  • 1 tsp water (only for the microwave)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste


Microwave Directions:

In a microwave safe bowl, melt butter
Add the brown sugar and stir
Heat for 30 seconds
Add Carrots and stir to coat
Heat for 4 minutes
Using a fork check for doneness, if it does not easily pierce with a fork heat for 2 more minutes


Stovetop:

Boil carrots until easily pierced with a fork (about 7 to 8 minutes)
Drain well and set aside
In the same pot melt the butter and brown sugar
Once melted add the carrots and coat  the carrots
Cook on medium low for a few minutes


Oven:

Melt butter and brown sugar as above 
Toss carrots to coat
Line a cookie sheet with parchment, lightly spray the parchment with oil
Lay the carrots in a single layer
Bake in the oven at 375 degrees F (190 C or 5 Gas Mark)

Steamer:

If you have a steamer, cook according to the directions on your steamer.
When they are done, finish them off using the stove top directions but use a fry pan.


Optional:  Sprinkle with dried Parsley after cooking or Lemon or Orange Zest.  You can add Cinnamon to the first steps (1/2 tsp)

Picture
I hope you enjoyed this recipe.  If you did, leave a comment below.  I also have a YouTube channel where I feature many of my recipes.  If you would like to check it out, click on this link:  Bristlee One

Thank you for stopping by and remember, enjoy life.
It's the one you have,
Tammie
Picture
Nutritional information obtained using CalorieCount.com.
 
 
Picture
It has been almost 2 years since I went gluten free.  I am feeling better and rarely get sick anymore unless I glutenize myself.  Sometimes it is hard to resist that fresh bread on the table or a slice of pizza.  It doesn't happen very often but I miss that pizza and miss those fresh breads that you get at some restaurants.  I have spent the last 2 years making some "breads" but they are close but will never be the full gluten version.  Aw well.  This one is good and I like to make sandwiches out of it. Not everyone likes Buckwheat flour though. It is a taste that is very unique.  Some of the buckwheat flours can be very strong where others are mild. Makes me wonder how they do that.  Growing conditions?  Bleaching?  Not sure but I do prefer the more mild flour.  You could also make this with regular flour.  I don't buy any of the gluten free breads.  One, I'm not paying $6.00 for a loaf of "bread" and two, yuck.  Now that is really not fair as I have not tried ALL gluten free breads out on the market but the ones that I have...yuck.  Dry, crumbly, did I mention dry?  This bread freezes well also.  I slice it up, wrap it in wax paper and freeze.  The only way then to eat it, toasted.  This is a dense bread, not gonna kid you there but it goes well with soups, jams, jellies and with melted cheese.
Hope you enjoy.  
Picture
Print Friendly and PDF
Makes 1 loaf


Recipe:

1 1/4 cup Buckwheat Flour
187 g Mock Better Batter* or Better Batter® (~1 1/4 cup) ^
155 g regular Gluten Free Flour (~1 cup)^
1/2 TBSP Salt
3 TBSP Molasses
3 TBSP Sugar
1 TBSP Vegetable Oil
1 TBSP Vinegar
3 Eggs
1 TBSP Yeast
1 1/4 cup warm water (120-130 Degrees F or 49-55 C)

  • Gently heat water to 120-130 F
  • Add Molasses and Sugar to mixer bowl
  • Add heated water and mix until sugar is dissolved
  • Sprinkle yeast on top
  • Let sit for 10 minutes
  • The yeast should foam

  • Sift together the flours, salt
  • Beat eggs
  • Add flour to yeast mixture and beat with a bread hook, it will appear dry
  • Add the beaten eggs
  • scrape down sides
  • Add the vegetable oil and vinegar
  • Scrape down sides
  • Beat for 3 minutes on medium

  • Place into a greased proofing bowl and cover
  • Sit in a warm place for 2 hours
  • It will rise but not like gluten bread
  • At the end of the two hours gently remove it from the bowl onto a piece of parchment paper (lightly greased) (I usually just tilt the proofing bowl and let it roll out)
  • Mold into a round loaf
  • Wet your hands (damp) and smooth the top
  • Place all, including the parchment paper, into a dutchoven and Bake at 400 F ( 200 C or 6 Gas Mark)

*Mock Better Batter recipe is made by GlutenFree on a ShoeString find it here

^ You can use just 2 1/4 cup Gluten Free all purpose flour, this will make for a more liquid type dough.  Not to worry.  Just treat it the same though you will not be able to "roll it out onto" the parchment.  Just place the greased parchment paper into the dutchoven and gently "pour" the dough onto the parchment.
Bread, even gluten free bread can be tricky to make.  This one is pretty straight forward but do make sure that your yeast is good.  If it does not foam up, time for new yeast.  Try a pinch in warm water and sugar to see if it will foam first before you throw away the molasses and sugar water.
As for the flours.  I have made this with a variety of Buckwheat flours.  Some are very strong (Bob RedMills) and some are very mild (King Arthur's), I do prefer the mild.  This one was made with the Bob's so you can see how dark it is. Also, you can make this with a standard gluten free all purpose flour which I prefer but the dough will be very "wet".  You will not be able to mould it like you can with the Mock Better Batter combo.  
If you have any questions, concerns or problems please contact me.

I hope you enjoyed this recipe.  If you did, leave a comment below.  I also have a YouTube channel where I feature many of my recipes.  If you would like to check it out, click on this link:  Bristlee One

Thank you for stopping by and remember, enjoy life.
It's the one you have,
Tammie
Picture
Out of the oven. Do not cut this bread until it cools completely or it gets very dry.
Picture
 

Pesto!

03/04/2016

0 Comments

 
Picture
Here's the thing.  Since going gluten free over 2 years ago, where has the time flown, I haven't eaten certain foods because they are in my head as being associated with gluten.  Pesto is one of those.  Yes, yes, I know there is no gluten in pesto but it is because I only ate it with pasta.  In the past 2 years I've only had the gluten free pasta a handful of times and never once thought to make my pesto.  Why?  I don't know, just an association thing I guess.  I really do like pesto but the stuff that you buy in the store has too much cheese or it just doesn't taste fresh enough.  I like making my own and really it doesn't take all that much time.  If you have a blender or a food processor you're golden.  If does take fresh ingredients though.  This is one of those foods that I insist has to be made with fresh basil, cloves of garlic, fresh squeezed lemon, fresh ground pepper, I think you get my drift.  There is just something about the taste that just sends me into a sort of food nirvana.  
Now I had to rethink my use of pesto as I am not eating a lot of rice or rice based products these days.  I wanted pesto though and needed a vehicle for it.  You need a vehicle other than a spoon to get it into your mouth, really you do.  I did see just recently that people have been slicing cauliflower into "steaks" and roasting it.  Well, that might make a good vehicle so I tried it with my pesto below.  How about celery sticks?  That would be a good vehicle but what about celery sticks with cream cheese with pesto?  That would be a brilliant vehicle! No pictures of the last one as I ate them all before I could take a picture.  Believe me, they were scrumptious.  You could make a appetizer with cucumber rounds, a dab of mascarpone cheese with some of the pesto on top and a small mint leaf.  Oh my gosh.  I'm on a roll.
So I made two different pestos today because, I ah, well just wanted it.  I have enough left over for tomorrow's snack.  Yippy!

As always, you can double or triple these recipes for the number of people you have.  

The Lemon, Walnut Pesto was made with 2 cups of loosely packed leafs, I wanted to show the difference on what happens when you pack the leafs.
Picture
Print Friendly and PDF


Recipes:




Lemon, Walnut Pesto



2 cups packed cleaned Basil leaves, torn up
6 mint leaves, torn up
3 cloves of garlic, chunk sliced
1 TBSP fresh squeezed lemon (I used 2 because I love, love, love lemon)  Add one try it and then add more if you like
5 tsp Olive oil, this also will depend how you like your pesto.  While you are running it in your blender or food processor, add your oil.  You can make it thick (as I did the next one) or a bit on the thinner side
2 TBSP Roasted Walnuts, if you have whole walnuts, put them on your cutting board and smash them a bit with the heel of your hand, or cut them up a bit.  Raw Walnuts will not work as they turn into a paste.
Salt and pepper to taste

Optional:  I don't put cheese in mine most times.  If you like, use 2 TBSP fresh finely grated Parmesan or other hard cheese.  Stir this in by hand at the end.

Throw it all into your blender/processor and just let it whirl away.  Do watch it and add oil to it if it is too thick.  Start with only 3 tablespoons and go from there.  You might want much more or simply the 5 from above.  Don't blend too long or you end up with a paste.


Sun-dried Tomato and Pistachio Pesto


2 cups packed cleaned Basil leaves, torn up
6 mint leaves, torn up
3 cloves of garlic, chunk sliced
Two heaping TBSP of sliced Sun-dried Tomatoes.  I use the type in oil.  Don't drain the oil, I included the oil in the heaping tablespoons
2 TBSP Pistachios.  I used salted, dried but you can use what you like.  These you are going to chop and break up a bit before putting them in. Raw Pistachios will not work as they turn into a paste.
5 tsp Olive oil, this also will depend how you like your pesto.  While you are running it in your blender or food processor, add your oil.  You can make it thick or a bit on the thinner side by adjusting at this point
Salt and pepper to taste

Optional:  I don't put cheese in mine most times.  If you like, use 2 TBSP fresh finely grated Parmesan or other hard cheese

Throw it all into your blender/processor and just let it whirl away.  Do watch it and add oil to it if it is too thick.  Start with only 3 tablespoons and go from there.  You might want much more or simply the 5 from above. Don't blend too long or you end up with a paste.
Picture
Not sure how the other bloggers keep their kitchen so spotless when they are cooking. Mine always looks like a food bomb went off.
I then roasted the cauliflower.  I cut it into about 3/4" "steaks" and sprayed with coconut oil and then put some fresh ground salt and pepper on them.  I then roasted at 350 degrees F on one side for 10 minutes and then flipped them.  I then roasted for another 10-15 minutes.

I also cooked butter steaks, well I had a butter steak my son just had a steak.  I took butter at room temp and stirred in some fresh cut up dill and garlic and rubbed that on the steak.  Normally I BBQ but we ran out of propane about 5 minutes into grilling.  I have a cast iron grill pan so I finished up in that.  Now the pesto didn't present well in the pictures but take my word for it, oh so yummy.  I ended up putting it on the steak too.
Picture
I hope you enjoyed this recipe.  If you did, leave a comment below.  I also have a YouTube channel where I feature many of my recipes.  If you would like to check it out, click on this link:  Bristlee One

Thank you for stopping by and remember, enjoy life.
It's the one you have,
Tammie
Picture
Here you can see the difference with packing the leafs. The Sun-dried Tomato Pesto on the left is the packed leafs. What I did was used the entire plant. I buy the live plants from the produce department and then strip all the leafs off. It usually comes to about 2 cups. The one on the right was the loosely packed leafs. Half as much!